I rescued this bike almost ten years ago. I restored it just enough to make it rideable, but trials was never my thing, so it's been hanging on my wall ever since. It's a pretty cool piece of history, so if it's worth something to you, let me know.
I'm attaching the email I got in response to my inquiries, back when I found it - from the builder; explains a lot more than I ever could.

Robert,
that is really cool! I personally made that thing in about 1993. Amazing that it has the original paint on it. Did you get it from a guy named **** ********?
You have a piece of US Cycling history on our hands. I personally made these from 1991 through 1994, by hand. Kenn Rymdeko and I did production, using US milled P.A.T.C.O. purchased at Dillsburg Areoplane Works via owner Charlie Vogelsong. I designed the geometry to 1) be an alternative to the then-current, fragile Monty and Ibis bikes otherwise available, and 2) with geometry that would handle the the more dynamic, powerful style which trials was heading towards. It necessitated a longer top tube and stiffer overall feel for power transfer. That was my philosophy. The seat tube has a brazed-on strengthening sleeve, along with the connector strut. Overbuilt back then but, were were all about strength and handling (just like today). Brazing that sleeve on was always reallt fun as it was sort of the textbook description of "capillary action" as you brought it up to temperature and the brass just sucked right in... Kenn cut a lot of those, as well as most of the other ones from 25' length tubes (we were lucky to be partnered up with an ultralight aircraft company, and luck to be able to put our tubing orders in with theirs). The low/laid-back seat angle was a result of my moto-trials experience and inflience. Motorcycle trials bikes backthen were really becoming low slung and their sport was evolving as well with bicycle trials-inspired hopping and dynamism. The seat was more of a locator and place for calf pressure during counter balancing. Our original frame fixture was about 400lbs, so our aircraft welder just hated the seat-tube/chainstay juncture as it was him doing the moving more than the fixture. Complex with all the little tubes to circumnavigate.
So became my designs. Looking at the dropouts, I am curious as to their thickness. The BMX world back then was also all about building the stongest, burliest stuff. We had original dropouts stamped from 1/8" plate, then I doubled-up and welded them together for "double-thick" strength. Pretty heavy, though. You might be able to see a weld bead right along the total perimeter on them -- giveaway to double-thicks.
Long front/short rear, stiff BB for power transfer and snappy front ends -- that was my design philosophy with trials and mountain bikes back in 1991. That philosophy is still current and relavent today, as can be seen in my and many bicycle designs/geometries.
Long front/short rear, stiff BB for power transfer and snappy front ends -- that was my design philosophy with trials and mountain bikes back in 1991. That philosophy is still current and relavent today, as can be seen in my and many bicycle designs/geometries.
Anyway, your bike is classic. The head tubes and forks were purchased from Mike Devitt at SE Racing, and were the strongest things available back then. The original purchaser has installed a newer-school Monty handlebars and stem, circa about 1995-6. As you can see, the original fork has a threaded headset, so the owner installed an adaptor. Cranks look newer as well, as we used Monty Power Cranks back then. Are they Bullseye Cranks? The skid-plate looks original, leading me to belive that it was not ridden too hard. As for a seat/post, I think the post size is 26.8, so you can source anything out there with a "rotating" clamp, like a Thompson or Bontrager. The rotation will give you the desired angle.
Please keep me updated on your restoration and progress as a trials rider. I would love to see more photos. I am psyched to see it being ridden -- you've made my day for sure. Please look on the bottom bracket to see if there is a serial number. I would be interested in that.

Best Regards and Best of Luck, and please keep in touch!
Jay de Jesus
> EWR Bikes, LLC.